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Centre for Urban Schooling

Fifth Annual William Waters Symposium on Urban Education

Symposium Update:

We are really excited to share the video of the evening Public Lecture.

Here is the link to view the video: http://youtu.be/y5CRGqUw_5k

 

 

Public Lecture - Wednesday, April 17, 2013  

BEYOND THE THREE R'S: Troubling Reconciliation,  Restitution, & Resurgence 

A conversation for Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Educators

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keynotes:

Ellen Gabriel (Kanien’kehá:ka Nation, Turtle Clan), was well-known to the public when she was chosen by the People of the Longhouse and her community of Kanehsatà:ke to be their spokesperson during the 1990 “Oka”/Kanehsatà:ke Crisis. For the past 22 years, Ms. Gabriel has been a human rights advocate for the collective and individual rights of Indigenous peoples.

Taiaiake Alfred is Mohawk, born in Montréal and raised in the Kahnawake Mohawk Territory. He is a Full Professor in IGOV (Indigenous Governance) and in the Department of Political Science at University of Victoria, specializing in studies of traditional governance, the restoration of land-based cultural practices, and decolonization strategies.

Susan D. Dion is an Indigenous scholar (Potawatami /Lenape) who has been working in the field of education for over twenty-five years. Professor in the Faculty of Education at York University in Toronto her research interests include Decolonizing and Indigenizing education; Urban Aboriginal Education; and violence prevention in Indigenous communities

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William Waters Symposium on Urban Education: Seminars -
Thursday, April 18th, 2013

Location: Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, 16 Spadina Road

Seminar Information

The three seminars described below are free, have limited registration, and are open to all. Lunch, prepared by an Aboriginal caterer, will be served to all morning and afternoon participants.

 Register for the Seminars at: http://www.watersfollowupseminars.eventbrite.ca

A. Taiaiake Alfred: 9:00 – 11:30 am (Talking Room)
Primary Focus: Community and Governance

Gerald Taiaiake Alfred is a Full Professor in IGOV (Indigenous Governance) and in the Department of Political Science at University of Victoria. He specializes in studies of traditional governance, the restoration of land-based cultural practices, and decolonization strategies. He is a prominent Indigenous intellectual and advisor to many First Nation governments and organizations. He has been awarded a Canada Research Chair, a National Aboriginal Achievement Award in the field of education, and the Native American Journalists Association award for best column writing.

Educated at Concordia and Cornell, Taiaiake has lectured at universities and colleges in Canada, the United States, England, and Australia. His writing includes numerous scholarly articles, essays in newspapers, magazines and journals, stories, book-length research reports for First Nations and government clients, as well as three published scholarly books, Wasáse (Broadview, 2005), a runner-up for the McNally Robinson Aboriginal Book of the Year in 2005; Peace, Power, Righteousness (Oxford University Press, 1999/2009); and Heeding the Voices of Our Ancestors (Oxford University Press, 1995).

Taiaiake's current research involves studying the effects of environmental contamination on Indigenous cultural practices, with a special focus on the Mohawk community of Akwesasne. In the context of the United States' Natural Resources Damages Assessment process, he works as a consultant with a number of Indigenous communities to assess cultural injury due to industrial and nuclear contamination of the natural environment, and to design land-based cultural restoration plans. His previous research and consulting work centered on retraditionalization, structural reform, and leadership training for First Nations governments and organizations. He also spent many a number of years as a researcher, writer, negotiator and advisor for First Nations governments in land claims and self-government processes.

Taiaiake is a Bear Clan Mohawk. He was born in Montréal in 1964 and was raised in the Kahnawake Mohawk Territory. Aside from his service in the US Marine Corps as an infantryman during the 1980s, he lived in Kahnawake until 1996. He now lives on Snaka Mountain in Wsanec Nation Territory on the Saanich peninsula with his wife and three sons, who are all Laksilyu Clan of the Wet'suwet'en Nation.

 

B. Ellen Gabriel: 1:00 – 3:30 pm (Talking Room)
Primary Focus: Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Schooling

  Kanien’kehá:ka Nation - Turtle Clan Kanehsatà:ke Mohawk Territory Indigenous
  Human Rights Activist.   Ms. Gabriel was well-known to the public when she was
  chosen by the People of the Longhouse and her community of Kanehsatà:ke to
  be their spokesperson during the 1990 “Oka”/Kanehsatà:ke Crisis; to protect  
  the Pines from the expansion of a 9 hole golf course in “Oka”/Kanehsatà:ke .

  For the past 22 years she has been a human rights advocate for the collective
  and individual rights of Indigenous peoples and has worked diligently to
  sensitize the public, academics, policing authorities and politicians on the 
  history, culture and identity of Indigenous peoples. She has made numerous
  public presentations on Indigenous rights and history, including presentations to
Parliamentary committees and the National Assembly on legislative amendments affecting the rights of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. 

She has been active at the international level participating at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous issues, negotiations on the Nagoya Protocol of the Convention on Biodiversity and most recently, at the UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. She has traveled across Canada, to the Hague in Holland, Strasbourg, France to address the European parliament, and to Japan to educate people about the events in her community during the 1990 “Oka”/Kanehsatà:ke crisis when she was chosen by the Longhouse and her community to be their spokesperson.

Ms. Gabriel has a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Concordia University where she graduated in May 1990. She worked as an Illustrator/Curriculum developer for Tsi Ronteriwanónha ne Kanien’kéka/ Kanehsatà:ke Resource Center in Kanehsatà:ke and also worked as an Art Teacher for the Mohawk Immersion School for grades 1-6. Ellen has also worked on videos illustrating legends of the Iroquois people and the local community stories. She is presently an active board member of Kontinón:sta’ts – Mohawk Language Custodians and First Peoples Human Rights Coalition. In 2004, Ellen Gabriel was elected president of the Quebec Native Women’s Association a position which she held for 6 ½ years, until December 2010.

Awards: In 2005 Ms. Gabriel received the Golden Eagle Award from the Native Women’s Association of Canada; 2008 International Women’s Day Award from the Barreau du Québec/Québec Bar Association and as well in August 2008 Ms. Gabriel was the recipient of the Indigenous Women’s Initiative “Jigonsaseh Women of Peace Award” for her advocacy work. Ellen worked at McGill University as the Coordinator of the First Peoples' House, which supports Aboriginal students studying at McGill.

She believes that decolonization will be achieved by implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples with the full and effective participation of Indigenous peoples. She believes that education controlled by First Nations peoples based upon our languages and culture are paramount to the revitalization of our institutions damaged by the Indian Act, the Indian Residential School and colonial legislation and policy. Our traditional knowledge is precious, is one of the key components for Indigenous peoples in overcoming colonial oppression. She is an advocate for gender equity, the revitalization of Indigenous languages, culture, traditions and Indigenous governing structures
 

C. Susan Dion and Jean-Paul Restoule: 9:00 – 11:30 am (Cafeteria)
Primary Focus: Research & Indigenous Methodologies

Susan Dion

Dr. Susan D. Dion is an Indigenous scholar (Potawatami /Lenape) who has been working in the field of education for over twenty-five years.  She is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Education at York University in Toronto and her research interests include Decolonizing and Indigenizing education; Urban Aboriginal Education; and violence prevention in Indigenous communities. Dr. Dion works in collaboration with the Toronto District School Board Aboriginal Education Centre on research and program development. Her book titled Braiding Histories: Learning from Aboriginal Peoples' Experiences and Perspectives is available from University of British Columbia Press. Dr. Dion is widely consulted by diverse community groups, workplaces, and institutions on developing methods for building more equitable, respectful relationships between Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal people.

 

Jean Paul Restoule
Jean-Paul Restoule, Wazhuzhk dodem, Anishinabe, is a member of the Dokis First Nation (Dokis) in mid-northern Ontario, and was raised in Orangeville, northwest of Toronto. He is associate professor of Aboriginal Education in the Department of Leadership, Higher and Adult Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. He has been a member of OISE’s Indigenous Education Network since 1998 and was a co-chair of the network for 7 years.

He co-founded SAGE Ontario, a peer support group for graduate students whose research involves Aboriginal communities, and is an original member of the OISE working group to infuse teacher education with Aboriginal perspectives called Deepening Knowledge, Enhancing Instruction. He’s contributed to research on urban Aboriginal identity, HIV prevention messaging in Aboriginal communities, access to post-secondary education for Aboriginal people, and curriculum development with Aboriginal perspectives.
 

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