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Centre for Urban Schooling

student Engagement

 

CUS believes that schools are not neutral places:  they can just as easily disengage students, as engage them. To us, this means that "student engagement" is something that has to be constantly figured out by students, their families and advocates, teachers, community members, and the decision-makers in education.  We've started to do that here, but we need your input, too!  So, have a look around this Student Engagement wiki-space, and tell us what you think!

redefining student engagement

In November 2007, the Centre for Urban Schooling hosted a two-day symposium on student engagement.  Entitled Redefining Student Engagement, the symposium brought together local and international academics, educators, practitioners, policy makers - as well as youth, themselves - to discuss critical questions concerning student engagement.

Click on the links below for highlights from the Symposium.

Video Clips

Podcasts

Models of Student Engagement

Other Expressions of Student Engagement

Student Engagment Resources

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Towards a Multidimensional framework for student engagement

Towards a Multidimensional Framework... is the final report from Redefining Student Engagment.  After the Symposium, a team of researchers and practitioners from the Centre for Urban Schooling worked with the notes and videos gathered from each panel session, in an attempt to generate a multidimensional framework for student engagement. The purpose of this framework was two-fold:  1) to continue the conversation – among multiple stakeholders and contexts – about the different forms, purposes, hindrances, and supports of student engagement; and 2) to provide school staff with a guideline for creating and maintaining the conditions in which students can be successfully engaged in their learning – both through formal schooling, and beyond. 

In the final report, this multidimensional framework is represented through a conceptual model of student engagement.  The model was designed with school practitioners, administrators, students and youth in mind:  we hope that it is both a useful guide for, and representation of, student engagement. To download the report, click here.

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